The Occupation in Figures
Nagorno-Karabakh: 1988-1992, territory 4400 km2; Shusha: may 08, 1992, territory 289 km2; Lachin: may 18, 1992, territory 1840 km2; Kalbajar: april 2, 1993, territory 3054 km2; Aghdam: july 23, 1993, territory 1150 km2; Fizuli: august 23, 1993, territory 1390 km2; Jabrayil: august 23, 1993, territory 1050 km2; Gubadli: august 31, 1993, territory 802 km2; Zangilan: october 29, 1993, territory 707 km2.

Top Azerbaijani official: geopolitical ambitions - core of Karabakh conflict

Top Azerbaijani official: geopolitical ambitions - core of Karabakh conflict

27.04.2016

Trend:

Geopolitical ambitions lie at the core of the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict, Novruz Mammadov, deputy head of the Azerbaijani presidential administration, chief of the administration's foreign relations department said.

He made the remarks on Apr. 27 while speaking at the Breakout Session "Constructing Peace, Deconstructing Terror" within the framework of the 7th Global Forum of the UN Alliance of Civilizations in Baku.

"Seven districts around Azerbaijan's Nagorno-Karabakh region were occupied, but no one talks about this," Mammadov said. "International law is not respected. Nowadays, international legal principles are ignored in the issue of the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict."

The conflict between the two South Caucasus countries began in 1988 when Armenia made territorial claims against Azerbaijan. As a result of the ensuing war, in 1992 Armenian armed forces occupied 20 percent of Azerbaijan, including the Nagorno-Karabakh region and seven surrounding districts. The 1994 ceasefire agreement was followed by peace negotiations. Armenia has not yet implemented four UN Security Council resolutions on withdrawal of its armed forces from the Nagorno-Karabakh and the surrounding districts.

Mammadov stressed that four UN resolutions were adopted regarding the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict, adding that they are also being ignored.

"Tense situation prevails in many regions of the world because of such an unfair approach," he said.

He went on to add that the international media outlets have their own interests, too, and they have become participants of international relations process.

"We want justice to be established, but this doesn't happen, because the leading countries don't want it," Mammadov said.