The Occupation in Figures
Nagorno-Karabakh: 1988-1992, territory 4400 km2; Shusha: may 08, 1992, territory 289 km2; Lachin: may 18, 1992, territory 1840 km2; Kalbajar: april 2, 1993, territory 3054 km2; Aghdam: july 23, 1993, territory 1150 km2; Fizuli: august 23, 1993, territory 1390 km2; Jabrayil: august 23, 1993, territory 1050 km2; Gubadli: august 31, 1993, territory 802 km2; Zangilan: october 29, 1993, territory 707 km2.

Armenia seek to conceal data about foreigners visiting occupied Azerbaijani territories, says Azerbaijan

Armenia seek to conceal data about foreigners visiting occupied Azerbaijani territories, says Azerbaijan

06.06.2016

Armenia seeks to conceal information about foreigners visiting the occupied Azerbaijani territories, Hikmat Hajiyev, spokesman for Azerbaijan’s Foreign Ministry, told APA on June 6

The so-called regime created by Armenia in Nagorno-Karabakh is using the method of not stamping the passports of foreign nationals visiting the occupied territories of Azerbaijan as well as some other methods, Hajiyev noted.

According to him, the Armenian side has resorted to this method in order to hide data pertaining to foreigners visiting the Armenian-occupied territories after Azerbaijan began to list such visitors as “undesirable persons.”

“The so-called regime used to apply a mechanism of issuing fake visas, which was deserted afterwards. Then they began not to stamp the passports of foreigners visiting the occupied territories. This method was deserted too,” the spokesman said. “Now they give a small sheet to foreigners visiting the occupied territories. They do all they can to cover up the data about those foreigners.”

Hajiyev added that the trend following the application of the list of “undesirable persons” indicates the number of visitors has declined.

“In this respect, the awareness factor is worth mentioning. Azerbaijani diplomatic missions convey necessary information to public circles and local media in the countries where they operate,” he said noting that even foreign ministries of most countries are calling on their citizens to refrain from traveling to the occupied territories of Azerbaijan.

The spokesman added that following the escalation on the contact line of Armenian and Azerbaijani troops in April, Yerevan and the Armenian lobby in Europe began to attempt to organize visits of foreign media representatives to the occupied territories under various pretexts.

 

The main goal of such visits, according to Hajiyev, is to cover up the responsibility of Armenia for the violent developments in April and mislead the international community.

 

“However, we can note a positive trend that a number of international media outlets appealed to the Azerbaijani Foreign Ministry for granting media representatives license allowing them to be engaged in legitimate journalistic activities in the country and visit the occupied territories. The Polish Public Television and a film crew of Ukrainian ICTV are among them.

 

In addition, Aljazeera Arabic and other international media agencies appealed to the ministry, Hajiyev said underlining that foreign media representatives wishing to cover the developments in the occupied Azerbaijani territories must first apply to the Azerbaijani Foreign Ministry for accreditation.

The Nagorno-Karabakh conflict entered its modern phase when the Armenian SRR made territorial claims against the Azerbaijani SSR in 1988.

A fierce war broke out between Azerbaijan and Armenia over the Nagorno-Karabakh region of Azerbaijan. As a result of the war, Armenian armed forces occupied some 20 percent of Azerbaijani territory which includesNagorno-Karabakh and seven adjacent districts (Lachin, KalbajarAghdam,FuzuliJabrayilGubadli and Zangilan), and over a million Azerbaijanis became refugees and internally displaced people.

The military operations finally came to an end when Azerbaijan and Armenia signed a ceasefire agreement in Bishkek in 1994.

Dealing with the settlement of the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict is the OSCEMinsk Group, which was created after the meeting of the OSCE Ministerial Council in Helsinki on 24 March 1992. The Group’s members include Azerbaijan, Armenia, Russia, the United States, France, Italy, Germany, Turkey, Belarus, Finland and Sweden.

Besides, the OSCE Minsk Group has a co-chairmanship institution, comprised of Russian, US and French co-chairs, which began operating in 1996.  

Resolutions 822, 853, 874 and 884 of the UN Security Council, which were passed in short intervals in 1993, and other resolutions adopted by the UN General Assembly, PACEOSCE, OIC, and other organizations require Armenia to unconditionally withdraw its troops from Nagorno-Karabakh.